All About Door Hardware

Have you ever given much thought to all of the door hardware inside and outside your home? From the front door to all of the interior doors and the cabinetry pulls and knobs, there are literally dozens.  We would venture to say that most of you have not even thought about them at all.  Door hardware can easily be forgotten, but just think of the many beautiful options that are available to fit every style and budget.

If you are really not sure how to choose door or cabinetry hardware, read on for some excellent advice and tricks of the trade.  Designer Sarah Gibson in her Room for Tuesday blog has compiled this list of questions to ask before purchasing hardware.

§  What is the door and overall style of the home?

§  How will this piece look with the existing decor?

§  What is the budget?

§  What is the appropriate size hardware needed for this door, cabinet, or wall?  Scale is important!

§  What does the installation process look like?

§  What are the requirements needed ? (privacy, passage, dummy, or entry)

Check out these beautiful doorknobs for some inspiration if you are remodeling or building a new home.

Photo Credits:

This Victorian escutcheon  along with a smooth round knob has a refined and lovely old world look. It comes in this antique brass finish as well as many others.   www.nostalgicwarehouse.com

For  a more contemporary design, we love this Windsor Crystal Knob with Modern Rectangular backplate from Emtek.  It comes, as shown, in a satin nickel finish, but many other finishes are available. www.emtek.com

Create an entry that sets an elegant tone for the rest of your home. After all, it is the first piece of hardware people notice and touch when entering your home. This Durham Beaded Oval Knob Exterior Door Hardware Set features a motif that was a common Colonial Revival Design and blends classic shapes with refined decoration.  www.restorationhardware.com

If you can see your hardware in person, all the better, but, if you do choose to order on-line, consider purchasing just one to make sure it is a good quality and has the look and finish you desire. Then, go ahead to purchase the additional ones needed.

 

 

A Few Trends from Highpoint Market

We have been following the Style Spotters who were at the recent fall market in Highpoint, North Carolina.  They reported on new trends that they found to be redefining the shape of home fashion – it seems that what is old is new again in many cases.

So, here are just two of their new product picks.

Internationally renowned designer and forecasting expert Stacy Garcia focused on pieces that featured unexpected pairings of materials and finishes.  We particularly liked the contemporary, yet rustic Double-Sided Bookcase Room Divider by Artitalia Group which combined the natural elements of raw wood with a modern material of steel.

Three other noted style spotters all selected this Egrets pattern from York Wallcoverings, but for somewhat different reasons.  Mary Douglas Drysdale chose it for its historical reference to eclectic romanticism. Designers Bria Hammel and  Holly Hollingsworth Phillips noted that designers are now introducing color more than ever into their projects. They both liked how this wallpaper packs so much punch into a space and reflects fearless design and whimsey. Designers and their clients who choose this wallpaper don’t shy away from color or pattern. These two designers feel that “it’s all about bravery and color this season.”

Photo Credits

www.highpointmarket.com

www.yorkwall.com



 

 

Two Very Different Chandeliers

We have been sourcing dining room chandeliers for two clients – two totally different chandeliers, both very good looking.  One of the clients wanted a very contemporary chandelier while the other expressed an interest in a traditional crystal one.  

Keep an eye out for a future blog where we will go into more detail about the myriad of other styles of chandeliers, about finding the right size chandelier, and also about various types of crystal.

But, for now, these are a few of the ones we found in each style. We know there is a perfect chandelier for every taste.

Tete-a-Tetes, Then and Now

When we think of tete-a-tetes, we usually think of Victorian times, but there are many more modern versions as well.  Tete-a-tete literally means head to head in French, and it is a two-seat sofa, basically consisting of two chairs joined together. Its primary use was for private conversations as its other names suggest.  The tete-a-tete is also known as a courting chair or a gossip couch. It was developed during the early 19th century in France and was popularized during the Victorian era. The Victorian ideals of modesty and controlled courtship are illustrated by the shared armrest which provided a slight barrier between the couple sitting on the sofa!

One of the most famous examples of a tete-a-tete is this one which was made by John Belter, an American cabinetmaker, around 1850-1860.  His extravagant use of carved ornamentation is typical of Rococo Revival style.  It is displayed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

In many mid-century modern versions of the tete-a-tete, the shared armrest for modesty is gone – in fact this Edward Wormley tete-a-tete from 1950 looks more like modern double chaises we see today.  We saw this one for sale on www.decaso.com for $15,000.

We thought this ultra-contemporary tete-a-tete that we saw on Houzz is a very unique and dynamic art piece, but we could not find any information about where it could be purchased.

The rattan Confident armchair from Maison Drucker that we saw in Elle Décor comes in a range of colorful options as a part of its outdoor bistro seating collection.  It is priced at $3912.

For some, two heads may be better than one!

DeKauri Bespoke Bath Cabinet - Art Meets Utility

We noticed this piece in a design magazine, and it piqued our interest so we did a bit more research, and we found some interesting information.

If you cannot stand a cluttered vanity full of toiletries, and if you can afford to spend $25,000, this freestanding piece of furniture designed to house and conceal both the sink and storage may be just the ticket.

Renowned architect and designer Daniel Germani debuted this piece at the 2018 Kitchen and Bath Industry Show last January.  He won the 2018 NYCxDesign Award in the bath category for its beauty and functionality. Germani used Dekton by Cosentino to craft the washbasin along with Kauri wood from New Zealand for the credenza. This 50,000 year old wood is exclusive to Riva 1920, an Italian furniture manufacturer whose skilled workers transform it into furniture as true works of art. Kauri is wonderfully preserved and has an amazing rough beauty that caught the attention of Germani. Once Germani added a faucet from Fantini Rubinetti, a high-end Italian design/manufacturing company and the upscale architectural lighting from Brooklyn-based Juniper Design, his credenza was complete.

It was fun to learn about this new product!  If you know of anyone who may want to purchase this outrageously priced bath credenza, please let us know because we sure don’t!

Fringe and Tassels

Sometimes we think we are behind the times with design trends, and sometimes we think we are way ahead of the curve.  For example, several years ago, we trimmed this sofa for our client’s very traditional living room with a beautiful bullion fringe to really dress it up.  Of course, we realized this was not a new idea – fringe was often used liberally on Victorian and Edwardian furniture and lampshades.  But, at the spring markets, fringe was back in more unexpected and bold ways.  We spied the contemporary Nicolene chest from Currey and Company in a recent article by Patricia Sheridan in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  According to Cecil Adams, creative director, “fringe is never completely out of fashion”.   He went on to say that “they chose to embellish this chest with modern brass pulls and leather tassels as a nod to handbag hardware.” On the other end of the spectrum, we found this over-the-top lampshade at www.vintageshades.com a company that specializes in making custom Victorian style shades and reproduction antique lamps. One of their lamps would certainly go well in the Gingerbread Cottages we last wrote about!  Fringe and tassels add visual interest and are always in style – from ultra-modern to traditional to Victorian, there is something for all tastes.

 

 Our client was so pleased with this beautiful bullion fringe!

Our client was so pleased with this beautiful bullion fringe!

 Contemporary take on tassels!   

Contemporary take on tassels!

 

 Beautiful, but awfully fussy for modern tastes!

Beautiful, but awfully fussy for modern tastes!

Two Color Schemes - One Classic and One a Little Bit Out There

From sophisticated black and white checkerboard flooring to more casual black and white ticking stripes, this color scheme has been a lasting one throughout the decades.  Design icon Dorothy Draper used black and white in her decorating schemes in the 1930’s, and today, many designers use black and white as their “go to” color scheme. New black and white furniture pieces from a number of manufacturers were spotted at the Fall Furniture Market in Highpoint, North Carolina.  Highland House, a high end furniture company is no exception. Nathan Copeland, president of Highland House says that “the color black helps to ground a room, giving it a focal point, while white provides a sense of freshness.”  Black and white can stand alone or is amazing with pops of bright color to punch it up.

We all seem to have a pair of colors that we use often – in our clothing or in decorating our homes.  Sticking with traditional pairs like black and white may be a safe bet, but maybe it is time to move a little bit outside our comfort zone.  The Crimson and Deep Violet duo we saw on the Domino Magazine website is beautiful, untraditional, and complementary. It could be risky, but, in smaller doses and in the right place, it will be stunning.  The magazine suggests “filtering in accent pieces that belong within the spectrum of the two shades.”  We also suggest using lots of neutrals to balance the brightness and boldness!

The Beaufort Center Hall Table by Highland House Furniture is a contemporary take on a design classic.  www.highlandhouse.com

 

 

 Times Square – Black and white checkerboard floor by Emser Tile – This is the tile that designer Tobi Fairley is installing in her foyer as a part of the year-long renovation of her home.  She is chronicling her project as the newest columnist of Traditional Home magazine.

Times Square – Black and white checkerboard floor by Emser Tile – This is the tile that designer Tobi Fairley is installing in her foyer as a part of the year-long renovation of her home.  She is chronicling her project as the newest columnist of Traditional Home magazine.

 Toile Fabric is a timeless choice in black and white – This Bouvier comforter set by Thomasville at Home can be found at www.wayfair.com. 

Toile Fabric is a timeless choice in black and white – This Bouvier comforter set by Thomasville at Home can be found at www.wayfair.com. 

Crimson and Deep Violet - unexpected color pairing - Domino copy.jpg

This is the unusual color scheme that caught our eye on www.domino.com.

A Fabulous Find for Your Bathroom

Stone Forest Sculptural Soaking Tub

We saw this beautiful bathtub in a recent edition of Traditional Home and did a little bit more research.  Stone Forest is a group of artisans and designers focused on bringing the elegant simplicity of natural materials into the bath and garden. The Papillon Soaking Tub is carved from one block of stone – granite, Carrara marble, limestone, sandstone, or travertine. With its curvy and sexy lines, it is truly a work of art that also offers a relaxing spa-like soak.

 Credits:  Silver Travertine Papillon Tub

 Stoneforest.com

Stone Forest Papillon Tub.jpg